On August 25, 2016, DoD, GSA, and NASA issued a final rule amending the FAR to implement President Obama’s Executive Order on “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” (“E.O.”) The Department of Labor (“DOL”) also issued final guidance to assist in the implementation of the E.O. The new FAR rule follows a proposed FAR rule that generated substantial comments. The final rule and guidance represent significant new obligations and risks for contractors and subcontractors, who should start preparing now to address them. This post focuses on the final FAR rule because it imposes specific requirements on contractors and subcontractors. Notably, this post provides only a high-level summary because the new rule, related commentary published in the Federal Register, and DOL’s guidance are lengthy and sometimes complex documents. Mayer Brown also published a Legal Update that discusses these developments in greater detail.
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Back in August 2015, DoD issued an interim rule, which was effective immediately (and was previously discussed on this blog), imposing substantial new requirements on government contractors with respect to reporting information system network penetrations—and providing new cloud computing requirements. Six weeks later, DoD issued a class deviation giving contractors more time to

A few days ago, on August 26, DoD issued new interim rules amending the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations (DFARS) with respect to “network penetration reporting and contracting for cloud services.” The new rules, which are now effective, revise several broadly applicable definitions applicable to numerous parts of the DFARS, expand the incident reporting requirements applicable to contractors, and impose security requirements applicable to cloud computing. DoD contractors need to understand these important new rules, which are summarized here, so that they can perform necessary compliance planning and make any necessary disclosures.
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2015-0126 Healthcare.govLast week, several press outlets, a well-regarded legal blog (albeit one that does not generally focus on Government contracts law/policy), and at least one politician criticized the IRS for the award of a relatively small IT services contract to a company called CGI Federal. CGI was the contractor at the center of the problematic rollout of the healthcare.gov website. Although there were clearly substantial problems with the website development and rollout, some of the criticism of CGI—and the implicit calls for substantial punishment of that contractor—demonstrate a lack of fair consideration of publicly available reports about the sources of the problems with the website and misunderstandings of aspects of procurement law and policy.
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iStock_000035162090LargeThis week, the Supreme Court denied the qui tam plaintiff’s petition for certiorari in United States ex. Rel. Rostholder v. Omnicare, Inc., a False Claims Act (FCA) case from the Fourth Circuit. In Omnicare, the relator alleged that the defendants violated the FCA because certain of its practices violated Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety regulations and Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries subsequently presented claims for reimbursement for its products. The district court dismissed the relator’s complaint for failure to state a claim upon which relief can be granted, and the Fourth Circuit affirmed. The Supreme Court’s denial of a writ of certiorari sends a signal that there are limits on FCA claims rooted in regulatory violations. Namely, an FCA claim cannot be based on a violation of a regulation that is wholly unrelated to any condition or requirement for payment.
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