Millions of Americans who were able to obtain health insurance as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA” or “Obamacare”) are waiting to learn the extent to which Congress and the new administration will repeal, replace, or do something else with the ACA. At the same time, Government contracts lawyers are watching a group of ACA-related lawsuits being litigated at the Court of Federal Claims and the Federal Circuit. The cases involve “risk corridors,” which the ACA implemented to entice insurers to enter healthcare exchanges by reducing downside risk if, among other possibilities, enrollment did not meet projections. After the ACA was implemented (and control of the Legislative branch had shifted), Congress effectively defunded the ACA’s risk corridors (i.e., reduced necessary appropriations), leaving the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) without sufficient funds to pay participating insurers. So far, approximately 20 of those companies have sued and are pursuing damages claims based on the Government’s failure to make promised payments.

Last November, the Court of Federal Claims issued its first merits ruling in one of the ACA risk corridor cases, Land of Lincoln Mutual Health Insurance v. U.S. Judge Lettow’s opinion in that case rejected the plaintiff’s claims based on “statutory entitlement,” breach of contract, and Fifth Amendment taking theories. A decision in a second case, Moda Health Plan v. U.S., was issued late last week by Judge Wheeler—who ruled in that plaintiff’s favor. In Moda Health, the court held that the relevant ACA provision “requires full annual payments to insurers” and, alternatively, that the Government’s non-payment constituted a breach of the implied-in-fact contract with the insurer.

How the current administration and Congress will change ACA—and the American healthcare system—is anybody’s guess. The ACA-related cases before the Court of Federal Claims are not getting the same amount of press as potential changes to the healthcare reform law, but they address important legal and financial consequences of the long-running policy dispute over the ACA. The cases raise complex legal issues that should be of substantial interest to Government contracts lawyers and practitioners before the Court of Federal Claims and the Federal Circuit.

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